Benedict Place Homes

Benedict Place is part of the "Pelhamwood Neighborhood," developed by Clifford  B. Harmon in the early 1900’s. The concept for the neighborhood derives from the aesthetic movement of the late 19th/early 20th century which sought to create park-like settings where homes gently inserted while preserving the natural setting of the area, including dense woodlands and craggy rocks. There was a sales office at the head of the stairs at Benedict Place. A fountain and a small pool containing live goldfish was situated at the bottom of the stairs with a sign that could be read from any passing train. "if you lived in Pelham, you would be home now”

20 Benedict Place

20 Benedict Place, is a fine example of the Italian Renaissance Revival style so popular in the 1920’s. Hallmarks of the style are the stucco exterior, barrel tile roof with wide overhanging eaves and symmetrical facade with protruding center bay and rounded-arch entry each articulated by quoining. The important architectural elements of this home are all preserved, including original windows, roof and, on the interior, original faience tile floor in the family room. An early owner, Francis E. Haag and his wife, four children and servants were living here in 1925, soon after the house was built in 1921. Haag served in WWI first as captain, then became chief of the Accounts Department, Finance Division of the Aircraft Production Board, appointed March 21, 1918, was promoted to Major on August 2, 1918 and was discharged February 1, 1919. During the 1920s he was a stockbroker, until the crash of 1929. He later became President of United Feldspar and Minerals Corporation and he, no doubt, enjoyed the easy 29 minute commute to his office at 10 East 40th Street in midtown Manhattan. The Haag family lived here until at least Mr. Haag's death in 1945.


Arthur L. Scinta

Daronco Town House, 20 Fifth Avenue
Pelham, NY, 10803, US


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